I haven’t written in my personal blog in a while, and I have good reasons (I moved to a new city, the new place will be a farm, I restarted my international travel, something secret that I can’t announce yet, and also did I mention I was a bit busy?). But I still can’t get over log4j (see previous article 1, article 2, and the parody song). The sheer volume of work involved (one company estimated 100 weeks of work, completed over the course of 8 days of time) in the response was spectacular, and the damage caused is still unknown at this point. We will likely never know the true extend of the cost of this vulnerability. And this bugs me.

Photos make blog posts better. People have told me this, repeatedly. Here’s a photo, I look like this.

I met up last month with a bunch of CISOs and incident responders, to discuss the havoc that was this zero-day threat. What follows are stories, tales, facts and fictions, as well as some of my own observations. I know it’s not the perfect story telling experience you are used to here, bear with me, please.

Short rehash: log4j is a popular java library used for application logging. A vulnerability was discovered in it that allowed any user to paste a short string of characters into the address bar, and if vulnerable, the user would have remote code execution (RCE). No authentication to the system was required, making this the simplest attack of all time to gain the highest possible level of privilege on the victim’s system. In summary: very, very scary.

Most companies had no reason to believe they had been breached, yet they pulled together their entire security team and various other parts of their org to fight against this threat, together. I saw and heard about a lot of teamwork. Many people I spoke to told me they had their security budgets increased my multitudes, being able to hire several extra people and buy new tools. I was told “Never let a good disaster go to waste”, interesting….

I read several articles from various vendors claiming that they could have prevented log4j from happening in the first place, and for some of them it was true, though for many it was just marketing falsehoods. I find it disappointing that any org would publish an outright lie about the ability of their product, but unfortunately this is still common practice for some companies in our industry.

I happened to be on the front line at the time, doing a 3-month full time stint (while still running We Hack Purple). I had *just* deployed an SCA tool that confirmed for me that we were okay. Then I found another repo. And another. And another. In the end they were still safe, but finding out there had been 5 repos full of code, that I was unaware of as their AppSec Lead, made me more than a little uncomfortable, even if it was only my 4th week on the job.

I spoke to more than one individual who told me they didn’t have log4j vulnerabilities because the version they were using was SO OLD they had been spared, and still others who said none of their apps did any logging at all, and thus were also spared. I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t be bragging about that to anyone…

For the first time ever, I saw customers not only ask if vendors were vulnerable, but they asked “Which version of the patch did you apply?”, “What day did you patch?” and other very specific questions that I had never had to field before.

Some vendors responded very strongly, with Contrast Security giving away a surprise tool (https://www.contrastsecurity.com/security-influencers/instantly-inoculate-your-servers-against-log4j-with-new-open-source-tool ) to help people find log4j on servers. They could likely have charged a small fortune, but they did not. Hats off to them. I also heard of one org that was using the new Wiz.io, apparently it did a very fast inventory for them. I like hearing about good new tools in our industry.

I heard several vendors have their customers demand “Why didn’t you warn us about this? Why can’t your xyz tool prevent this?” when in fact their tool has nothing to do with libraries, and therefore it’s not at all in the scope of the tool. This tells me that customers were quite frightened. I mean, I certainly was….

Several organizations had their incident response process TESTED for the first time. Many of us realized there were improvements to make, especially when it comes to giving updates on the status of the event. Many people learned to improve their patching process. Or at least I hope they did.

Those that had WAF, RASP, or CNDs were able to throw up some fancy REGEX and block most requests. Not a perfect or elegant solution, but it saved quite a few company’s bacon and reduced the risk greatly.

I’ve harped on many clients and students before that if you can’t do quick updates to your apps, that it is a vulnerability in itself. Log4j proved this, as never before. I’m not generally an “I told you so” type of person. But I do want to tell every org “Please prioritize your ability to patch and upgrade frameworks quickly, this is ALWAYS important and valuable as a security activity. It is a worthy investment of your time.”

Again, I apologize for this blog post being a bit disjointed. I wasn’t sure how to string so many different thoughts and facts into the same article. I hope this was helpful.

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